Is Perfectionism Limiting your Performance?

Have you ever wondered if you are a perfectionist?

Chances are, you would consider perfectionism as a positive trait – who doesn’t want to be perfect?

What is Perfectionism?

Perfectionism is defined as a broad personality style characterized by a person’s concern with striving for flawlessness and perfection and is accompanied by critical self-evaluations and concerns regarding others’ evaluations (Stoeber & Childs, 2010).

Here are some signs that you might be a perfectionist:

  1. Procrastinating on a task until you know you can do it perfectly
  2. Deem the results as the most important part of completing the task, you disregard the process you take to get your results
  3. To view a task as incomplete until it meets your expectations
  4. Take a longer time to finish a task that others typically take lesser time to finish

(Haase, Prapavessis & Owens, 2013)

How does Perfectionism limit your Performance?

Continue reading “Is Perfectionism Limiting your Performance?”

Asking the correct questions…

Imagine that you are trying to complete an assignment, learn a skill or to achieve a certain milestone.

The undertaking seems more difficult and requires more effort than you initially assumed.

As a result, you are somewhat frustrated and might be asking yourself one of these questions…

AB
“Why can’t I get this right?”
“Why do I have to do this?”
“What have I done wrong?”
“What can I do differently?”
“How can I break this down into simpler steps?”
“What can I learn from this?”

What’s the difference between these two groups of questions?

Would you feel and respond differently to questions from group A compared to group B?

What if you are a coach, what sort of questions would you ask your athlete?

Will they resemble questions from Group A – “Why can’t you get this right?” or Group B – “What can you do differently?”

Like most people, you would likely be more cognitive and solution-focused when you ask yourself questions from Group B.

Meanwhile, questions from Group A are likely to compound your frustration. You may even respond defensively when these questions are directed at you.

So what’s responsible for this difference in the way we feel and respond to these questions?

An understanding about how different regions of our brains respond to these questions will give us a better idea!

Continue reading “Asking the correct questions…”

A Positive Force Fueled by Adversity

Really enjoyed this local documentary #TheSongsWeSang#Netflixhttps://www.netflix.com/title/81310409 about Xinyao.

Xinyao was a movement that evolved from a period of major reforms to “align” chinese education into the national syllables. The Chinese educated bore the brunt of these reforms and the ensuing discrimination – the extent of this was denoted by a Straits Times headline in 1978 – ‘Nantah graduates are worth only $300 per month’ and the closure of Nantah University in 1980.

A positive force fuelled by adversity…

Xinyao was an outlet for the Chinese-educated to assert their identity against these changes. Instead of being destructive, it became a unifying force between Chinese and English speaking Cinaporeans. Xinyao also became a catalyst for the development of international Mandopop stars such as Eric Moo, Kit Chan and Stephanie Sun.

“Adversity introduces a man to himself”

Continue reading “A Positive Force Fueled by Adversity”